City receives Water Sensitive Cities Award

The City was very pleased to be awarded the third Water Sensitive Cities Award for its water sensitive practices at the final event of the Cooperative Research Centre for Water Sensitive Cities on Friday 17 December 2021.

The City received the award due to its water sensitive city benchmarking results from a workshop assessment undertaken in May 2021. The benchmarking was conducted using the Cooperative Research Centre for Water Sensitive Cities Index tool with input from the City and stakeholders through a workshop funded by the Water Corporation.

The City has received a report which outlines the findings of the assessment and actions to consider to further progress towards a water sensitive city which states:

  • That the City of Joondalup has been actively working to address water efficiency and water quality for a number of years and has implemented some highly innovative monitoring and irrigation systems.
  • The City recognises that its next challenge is to address infill development and the impacts of climate change including greater use of fit-for-purpose water (including reuse), as well as strengthening partnerships across the municipality to provide a more coordinated and comprehensive response.

The City recognises the vital importance of sustainable water management and the need to balance the provision of water services for the community with the protection of water resources in the context a drying climate and looks forward to continuing on the journey to being a water sensitive city.

Growing local native plants

Growing local native plants

Planting a local native garden is a great way to increase biodiversity and will save you water and money. Native plants require less water, fertiliser and maintenance and attract local wildlife such as insects, reptiles and birds. Using mulch in your garden also helps to reduce water and replicates the organic material that would normally build up in the environment.

Soil types

Within the City of Joondalup there are Cottesloe, Karrakatta and Quindalup soil types. Native plants thrive in the right soil conditions.

Soil Types Suburbs with Soil Type
Cottesloe Soils Beldon, Burns Beach, Connolly, Craigie, Currambine, Duncraig, Edgewater, Heathridge, Hillarys, Iluka, Joondalup, Kallaroo, Kinross, Marmion, Mullaloo, Ocean Reef, Padbury, Sorrento
Karrakatta Soils Craigie, Duncraig, Edgewater, Greenwood, Kingsley, Padbury, Warwick, Woodvale
Quindalup Soils Beldon, Burns Beach, Connolly, Craigie, Heathridge, Hillarys, Iluka, Kallaroo, Kinross, Mullaloo, Ocean Reef, Padbury

View the Growing Locals brochures for more information:

Growing Locals in Cottesloe Soils

Growing Locals in Karrakatta Soils

Growing Locals in Quindalup Soils

If you have two types of soil within your suburb, check the map in the Growing Locals brochure to see which soil type is relevant for your garden.

Caring for beaches

Caring for beaches

The City’s coastline is a popular destination for the local community, visitors and tourists. Actions you take when visiting the beach or within your own home and garden can impact on the health of your local beach. Ways you can help care for the beach:

When visiting the beach

  • Report any sick or injured marine animals or other wildlife to the Wildcare Helpline on 9474 9055
  • Do not clear any vegetation and/or remove individual plants such as orchids from coastal areas
  • Abide by the City’s designated dog exercise areas. Hillarys Dog Beach is the only beach where dogs can be exercised off lead. Dogs are permitted on lead along the coastal dual use path from Burns Beach to Marmion Beach. For more information visit places to exercise your dog
  • Stay on pathways and ensure you have clean footwear with no soil or other material when visiting the City’s coastal parklands and reserves to help reduce the risk of spreading plant diseases
  • Remove any litter you find. You could organise or participate in a Clean Up Australia Day event for your local beach
  • Do not drive off-road vehicles along beaches or in the dunes
  • Report suspicious behaviour to the Police on 131 444 or if you see a fire phone 000.

In your home and garden

  • Plant a local native garden. Your garden can act as a stepping stone for important flora and wildlife
  • Be weed wise in your garden – prevent environmental weeds and garden escapees
  • Community groups or schools can apply for funding through the City’s Environmental Development Community Funding to undertake a project, event or activity that helps to protect the City’s beaches
  • Keep domestic cats confined to your property
  • Do not release helium balloons as balloon fragments can be ingested by animals
  • Dispose of waste responsibly – litter can be blown onto beaches and into the sea, causing significant harm and in some cases can be fatal to animals.

 

Learning about beaches

Learning about beaches

The City is home to an amazing coastline stretching for 17kms between Marmion and Burns Beach including sandy beaches, rocky cliffs, coastal vegetation and the marine environment.

A diversity of marine animals including migratory birds, whales and sea lions live in the waters of the Indian Ocean. Other wildlife like the Echidna, Quenda and many reptile species also occur in the nearby land environment adjacent to the shore. The dune environment within the City includes important vegetation ranging from Spinifex grasslands, to coastal shrublands and upper storey trees such as eucalypts.

To learn more about the City’s coast:

Adopt a bushland teaching resources

Adopt a bushland teaching resources

The Adopt a Bushland program is for students in years 4 to 7 to raise awareness of the ecological values of local bushland and learn bushland management skills such as weeding and litter collection. The program includes the following 2013 Australian curriculum aligned teaching resources.

Key Learning Area Teacher’s Guides Student Worksheets
The Importance of Bushland What is a Global Citizen? Years 4-7 Uses for Bushland and Human Impacts Years 4-7
Indigenous Heritage Values Welcome to Nyungar Country Years 4-7

The Nyungar Six Seasons Years 4-7

Welcome to Nyungar Country Years 4-7

The Nyungar Six Seasons Years 4-7

Weed Control Bushland Weeds Years 4-7 Bushland Weeds Years 4-5

Bushland Weeds Years 6-7

Bushland Weeds Vocabulary

Bushland Weeds

Litter Collection Litter Years 4-7 Litter Background Years 4-5

Litter Background Years 6-7

Litter Years 4-5

Litter Years 6-7

Litter Persuasive Writing Table

Biodiversity Who lives here? What do I eat? What are my feet used for? Years 4-5

Bushland Activities Years 4-7

Adaptations Years 4-6

Adaptations Teacher Information Years 4-6

Who lives here? Years 4-5

What do I eat? What are my feet used for? Years 4-5

So you want to be a twitcher? Years 4-7

Exploring Leaf Litter Years 4-7

Bushland Flora and Fauna Adaptations Years 4-6

Adopt a coastline teaching resources

Adopt a coastline teaching resources

The Adopt a Coastline Program is for students in years 4 to 7 to raise awareness of the ecological values of the local coastline and learn about rehabilitation and protection activities along the coast. The program includes the following 2013 Australian curriculum aligned teaching resources.

Key learning area Teacher’s guides Student worksheets
The Importance of the Coast The Ocean is not a rubbish bin

Coastline Historical Timeline

Recollections of the Past / Uses and Impacts on our Coastline

The Ocean is not a rubbish bin

The Ocean is not a rubbish bin – simple version

The Ocean is not a rubbish bin – language sheet

Coastline Historical Timeline

Uses and Impacts on Our Coastline

Recollections of the Past

Indigenous Heritage Values  

A Day at the Beach for Traditional Noongar People

 

A Day at the Beach for Traditional Noongar People

Biodiversity Living on the Coast – Plant Adaptations, Life in the Extremes and Marine Molluscs

How waves erode a beach / How do plants stop erosion

Living on the Coast- Plant Adaptations

Life in the Extremes

Marine Molluscs

Year 4/5 How do waves erode a beach? / How do plants help stop erosion?

Year 6/7 How do waves erode a beach? / How do plants help stop erosion?

Beach Activities Beach Activities

What is a Global Citizen

Coastal vulnerability

Coastal vulnerability

The City of Joondalup coastline is highly valued by residents and visitors. The City has been undertaking work to better understand potential future impacts of climate change, such as erosion and storm surges, on the coast.

A coastal hazard assessment has been undertaken for the City’s coastline to identify areas that may become vulnerable to erosion over the next 100 years.

The coastal hazard assessment has found:

  • In the short term sandy beaches and associated infrastructure such as access ways and dune fencing may become vulnerable
  • In the long term (greater than 50 years) additional infrastructure such as car parks, some City owned buildings within coastal foreshore areas and some private property may potentially be at risk from severe storm erosion.

Coastal hazard areas for both 50 year and 100 year timeframes can be viewed by downloading the coastal hazard maps or by using Mapping Online.

Further information on the City’s coastal vulnerability and actions the City is taking to plan and adapt for future vulnerability can be found in the Coastal Vulnerability and the City’s Response – Frequently Asked Questions.

Information on how planning and development within coastal hazard areas may be affected can be found here or in the Coastal Vulnerability and Affected Property – Frequently Asked Questions.

Coastal Infrastructure Adaptation Plan

Coastal Infrastructure Adaptation Plan 2018-26 has been developed to ensure the City is adequately prepared to adapt to current and future coastal hazards and risk to City infrastructure and assets is minimised. The objectives of the Plan are to:

  • Improve understanding of the potential impacts of current and future coastal hazards.
  • Identify risk to the City’s infrastructure and assets as a result of current and future coastal hazards.
  • Identify and implement projects to minimise risk to the City’s infrastructure and assets from current and future coastal hazards.
  • Identify a long term approach that will guide the City’s future adaptation responses in the coastal zone.

Technical studies and investigations

Technical studies and investigations have been undertaken to better understand the potential impacts on the City’s coastline. These documents can be downloaded below.

Year

Title

2016 Joondalup Coastal Hazard Assessment 2016

Joondalup Coastal Hazard Assessment 2016 – Appendix A

Joondalup Coastal Hazard Assessment 2016 – Appendix B

2016 Coastal Monitoring Program Baseline Report 2016

Coastal Monitoring Program Baseline Report 2016 – Appendix A

Coastal Monitoring Program Baseline Report 2016 – Appendix B

Coastal Monitoring Program Baseline Report 2016 – Appendix C

Coastal Monitoring Program Baseline Report 2016 – Appendix D

2018 Coastal Monitoring Program 2017-18

Coastal Monitoring Program 2017-18 – Appendix A

Coastal Monitoring Program 2017-18 – Appendix B

Coastal Monitoring Program 2017-18 – Appendix C

Coastal Monitoring Program 2017-18 – Appendix D

2020 Coastal Monitoring Program 2019-20

Coastal Monitoring Program 2019-20 – Appendix A

Coastal Monitoring Program 2019-20 – Appendix B

Coastal Monitoring Program 2019-20 – Appendix C

Coastal Monitoring Program 2019-20 – Appendix D

Coastal Monitoring Program 2019-20 – Appendix E

 

Join the Coastal Vulnerability Stakeholder Notification List

Join the Coastal Vulnerability Stakeholder Notification List to be informed by email whenever new coastal vulnerability information is released and/or when opportunities to become involved in future planning for the City’s coastline become available.

 

 

 

Reducing waste

Reducing waste

Avoid – prevent waste in the first instance

  • Maintain and repair items rather than disposing of them
  • Grow your own fruit, vegetables, herbs and nuts at home
  • Purchase quality products that have no or minimal packaging.

Reduce – to produce less waste

  • Refuse single plastic e.g. cups and straws
  • Purchase in bulk where possible
  • Say no to junk mail
  • Only purchase what you need.

Reuse – use the same item more than once

  • Take your own reusable shopping and produce bags to the shops
  • Consider hosting a garage sale
  • Find creative ways to repurpose waste for practical purposes, art projects or gifts
  • Consider purchasing eco-friendly products made from recycled materials
  • Opt for reusable rather than disposable products, such as keep cups instead of disposable coffee cups, carry your own utensils to avoid single use knives, forks and spoons
  • Take reusable items to the REUSE shop at Tamala Park.

Recycle – converting waste materials into new materials and objects

  • Recycle all paper, cardboard, milk and juice cartons, glass bottles and jars, aluminium and steel cans, plastic bottles and containers in the yellow lid recycling bin
  • Green waste from the lime green lid is turned into compost
  • Place food or garden waste in a compost or worm farm at home
  • Instead of putting soft plastic in the red lid bin, take it to a REDcycle location
  • Take eligible containers to a Containers for Change drop off point
  • Clean and undamaged clothes can be donated to a local charity shop
  • Local schools can participate in a waste education program funded by the City of Joondalup, please visit this page or call 9400 4077 for further information.

Please refer to the A-Z Waste Disposal Guide to ensure you are sorting your waste correctly.

Saving water

Saving water

Everyone can do their bit to reduce water use in the home and garden to minimise environmental impacts. Follow these simple tips to save water in your home and garden:

  • Turn taps off tightly so they don’t drip
  • Fix leaking toilets, taps and showerheads
  • Install waterwise showerheads, mixer basin taps and dual flush toilets
  • Install flow restrictors in taps
  • Keep showers to four minutes or less
  • Choose local native plants that are adapted your garden’s soil type and climate
  • Add mulch to your garden to reduce water loss through evaporation from the soil surface
  • Greywater and rainwater are sustainable water sources that can be used to substitute scheme and ground (bore) water. Find out about installing a greywater system and rainwater tanks
  • Consider drip irrigation systems which deliver water directly to the root systems so there is minimal water loss
  • Use of a swimming pool cover reduces evaporation by up to 97 per cent and helps keep your pool warmer and cleaner.

The State Government enforces restrictions for garden irrigation. Remember to stick to your designated watering days and don’t forget the Winter Sprinkler Ban is in force from 1 June to 31 August.

Waterwise programs

For further information on saving water in the home and garden including waterwise plants, waterwise specialists and waterwise offers visit the Water Corporation. If you are a business, developer or commercial office consider participating in one of Water Corporation’s Waterwise programs.

 

Reducing energy use

Reducing energy use

Everyone can do their bit to reduce energy use and contribute to a cleaner, greener environment. Follow these simple tips to save energy in your home:

  • Heat and cool only the rooms you are using and close doors to other rooms
  • Ensure that your house has adequate insulation in the ceilings and walls to maximise efficiency of heating and cooling systems
  • Open windows in summer to let the afternoon sea breeze cool the house
  • Remember to set reverse cycle air conditioner thermostats to 18° – 21°C in winter and 24° – 27°C in summer.
  • Wash clothes in cold water instead of hot water
  • Choose energy-efficient appliances (especially fridges and freezers) with high Energy Star Ratings
  • Adjust your fridge temperature to between 3°C and 5°C and your freezer temperature to between -15°C and -18°C
  • Turn off lights when you leave a room
  • Choose energy efficient lighting globes such as compact fluorescent lights (CFL) or light emitting diodes (LEDs)
  • Turn appliances off at the wall when not in use, otherwise they may still be using power in standby mode
  • Consider installing renewable energy such as photovoltaic cells on your home.

The City has partnered with the ClimateClever Program to encourage households and schools to reduce their carbon footprint and save money on utility bills using a suite of online tools and an App which can now be accessed for free. Further information can be found on the ClimateClever website.

To find out how you can save energy in your home, complete the DIY Home Energy Audit.

For additional information, visit the following websites:

  • Synergy: Energy Saving Tips
  • Australian Government: Energy Star Ratings
  • Australian Government: Your Energy Savings
  • Department of the Environment and Energy: Energy Efficiency

Energy and climate management

Energy and climate management

Future climate change could have a significant impact on the City and its community. Responding effectively to climate change requires both reducing energy use and greenhouse gas emissions (mitigation) and being ready to adapt to climate change impacts as they occur (adaptation).

The City of Joondalup Climate Change Strategy 2014-2019 provides strategic guidance to the City’s climate change management activities including both mitigation and adaptation.

The Strategy identifies a number of projects to be implemented across the following six key focus areas:

  • Infrastructure and assets
  • Parks and reserves
  • Land use planning and development
  • Natural environment
  • Corporate responsibility and good governance
  • Community wellbeing.

Water management in the City

Water management in the City

Water is a precious resource and the City relies heavily on both scheme and groundwater resources in its operations and activities.

The City is committed to sustainable management of its water use. The City Water Plan 2016 – 2021 provides a strategic approach to improving water conservation and water quality management within the City.

The Plan identifies 34 projects that are implemented across the following eight key focus areas:

  • Water monitoring and reporting
  • Management of wetlands and public open spaces
  • Water sensitive urban design
  • Contracts and purchasing
  • Staff education and participation
  • Community education and participation
  • Partnership and policy.

Waterwise Council

The City has been recognised as a Gold Waterwise Council for its outstanding water saving strategies and significant progress towards best practise water efficiency within its operations.

The Craigie Leisure Centre is recognised as a Waterwise Aquatic Centre due to the best practice approach that is taken to managing water use within the facility.

Learning about bushland

Learning about bushland

There are a number of significant flora species and vegetation communities that exist within the City’s remnant bushland areas including the Banksia Woodlands threatened ecological community, mature Eucalyptus trees and a variety of shrub-lands and herbaceous species that provide habitat for nectar feeding birds and important invertebrates like the Graceful Sun Moth.

A range of other important native wildlife like the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo and Quenda (native marsupial) use these bushland areas for habitat purposes, such as foraging on local plants and sheltering from potential predators.

To learn more about your local bushland areas:

Caring for bushland

Caring for bushland

Actions you take when visiting bushland or within your own home and garden can impact on the health of our local bushland areas. Tips on caring for our bushland include:

When visiting bushland areas

  • Use available boot cleaning stations before entering and leaving the bushland to reduce the risk of spreading plant diseases
  • Do not clear vegetation and/or remove individual plants such as orchids from bushland areas
  • Keep dogs on a lead in bushland areas
  • Stay on pathways
  • Remove any litter you find. You could even organise or participate in a Clean Up Australia Day event for your local bushland
  • Report suspicious behaviour to the Police on 131 444 or if you see a fire phone 000.

In your home and garden

  • Plant a local native garden. Your garden can act as a stepping stone for important flora and wildlife
  • Be weedwise in your garden – learn about environmental weeds and garden escapees
  • Keep domestic cats confined to your property
  • Do not release helium balloons as balloon fragments can be ingested by animals
  • Dispose of waste responsibly – litter can be blown into bushland areas and be harmful to animals
  • If you are part of a community group or school you can apply for funding through the City’s Environmental Development Community Funding to undertake a project, event or activity that helps to protect the City’s bushland areas

You can find out more about how you can care for bushland in the Protecting our Natural Areas and Parks brochure.

Management of bushland

Management of bushland

The City undertakes a number of activities to manage its bushland areas including weed control, fencing, installing paths and signage, feral animal control, fire management and revegetation.

The City has identified five bushland reserves as Major Conservation Areas due to their high biodiversity values, ecological connectivity and regional importance. The City has developed Natural Area Management Plans for these reserves:

The City has also developed Management Plans to guide how it manages some of the key threats to our bushland areas including:

Environmental publications

Environmental publications

Biodiversity

Energy efficiency

Think Green

Sustainable transport

Waterwise

Environmental plans

 

Management of beaches

Management of beaches

The City undertakes a number of activities to manage its beaches including weed control, fencing, installing access ways, paths and signage, feral animal control, fire management, waste management, sand stabilisation and sand drift management and revegetation.

Site specific plans are being developed for key environmentally significant coastal areas that have high biodiversity values, ecological connectivity and regional importance. These plans guide on-ground management actions such as:

  • Marmion Coastal Foreshore Reserve Management Plan
  • Sorrento Coastal Foreshore Reserve Management Plan                                                                                                                            
  • Hillarys-Kallaroo Coastal Foreshore Reserve Management Plan
  • Mullaloo Coastal Foreshore Management Plan
  • Ocean Reef Foreshore Reserve Management Plan.

The City recognises that future climate changes and potential sea level rise may impact on the City’s beaches and coastal areas. The City has assessed potential future coastal hazards and is identifying ways to address those hazards.